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Native Mobile Development: A Cross-Reference for IOS and Android

Native Mobile Development: A Cross-Reference for IOS and Android

Current price: $49.99
Publication Date: December 17th, 2019
Publisher:
O'Reilly Media
ISBN:
9781492052876
Pages:
394
Usually Ships in 1 to 5 Days

Description

Learn how to make mobile native app development easier. If your team frequently works with both iOS and Android or plans to transition from one to the other this hands-on guide shows you how to perform the most common development tasks in each platform. Want to learn how to make network connections in iOS? Or how to work with a database in Android? This book has you covered.

In the book 's first part, authors Shaun Lewis and Mike Dunn from O Reilly 's mobile engineering group provide a list of common, platform-agnostic tasks. The second part helps you create a bare-bones app in each platform, using the techniques from part one.

  • Common file and database operations
  • Network communication with remote APIs
  • Application lifecycle
  • Custom views and components
  • Threading and asynchronous work
  • Unit and integration tests
  • Configuring, building, and running an app on a device

About the Author

Shaun Lewis is Mobile Engineering Manager and former Lead Software Engineer for iOS at O'Reilly Media. The first book he read, How to Build a Website in a Weekend, transformed his life at the age of 15. He has over 12 years of professional experience and started developing iPhone apps when iOS was still called iPhone OS. He has worked with a number of Fortune 500 companies and occasionally speaks at events about Apple product development. Shaun lives in Ohio with his wife, two kids, and a drawer full of old smartphones.Mike Dunn is the Principal Mobile Engineer at O'Reilly Media, a recognized member of the AOSP community, and a dedicated contributor to the Android open source ecosystem, including the popular tiling image library, TileView. He's contributed to Google's Closure library, and provided extensions for Google's next-gen Android media player, ExoPlayer. Mike has been programming professionally for about 15 years, and is continuing to study computer science in the master's program at Georgia Institute of Technology.